Dry Wonton and Egg Noodles - Mì Hoành Thánh Khô

8-10 Servings

0:45 Prep

0:25 Cook

Moderate - you'll be right

A barrier to introducing noodle soups to kids is its hot temperature and difficulty to keep to a minimal mess. For parents a common yet perplexing solution to this is to wait for the soup to cool down before serving. However, this often results in a pile of soggy noodles sopped in a puddle of lukewarm soup...uninviting to say the least. This is where wonton and egg noodles come in. They can either be served together in a soup or with the soup on the side. The dry version of wonton noodle soup is great for kids as it can be consumed over time without the texture of the egg noodles deteriorating.


The preparation of the egg noodles is key to obtain the ideal texture. When I was younger, Uncle Tai taught me to separate the egg noodles into a thin layer before placing them in the microwave for one minute. This dehydrates the egg noodles and changes its texture to that of something giòn (yourng) and dai (yai) - al dente with a bit of crisp (the same technique used in Uncle Tai’s Soy Sauce Noodles. Over the years, I have further developed this method and now prefer to slightly dehydrate the noodles to emphasise the characteristics that are more synonymous with egg noodles. It involves spreading the noodles in a thin layer, baking them for 10 minutes in the oven at 50°C, before briefly boiling them in salted water, then stunning them in cold water. For this recipe, make sure you immediately dress the warm egg noodles with a soy sauce based mixture. This way the noodles will absorb the sauce like a sponge but retain their textural features.


Dry wonton noodle soup can be similar to instant Indomie Mi Goreng (Indonesian dry instant noodles) but gives you complete control over the sauces and seasoning. If you would love to introduce your kids to wonton noodle soup, do them a favour with this dry version and get them hooked on its inviting flavours first!

Ingredients:

Wonton

  • 500g tiger/king prawns (head 2/3 minced & tail 1/3 cut in 4-6mm chunks)

  • 500g pork shoulder, minced

  • 3 spring onion, thinly sliced (white stalk only)

  • 10g mature ginger, grated

  • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce

  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil

  • ½ tablespoon sea salt

  • 1 ½ teaspoon sugar

  • 1 teaspoon white pepper, finely ground

Sauce

  • 10 tablespoons soy sauce

  • 3 tablespoons oyster sauce

  • 2 tablespoon sesame oil

  • 2-3 tablespoons garlic oil

  • 1 teaspoon sea salt

  • 4 teaspoons sugar

Other

  • 500g egg noodles

  • 75 wonton wrappers

  • 2 bunches of choy sum or bok choy

Method:

Wontons:

  1. Separate tail third of prawns from main body. In a food processor, blend the remains into a paste-like texture. 

  2. In a stand mixer, with meat hook or paddle attachment, mix the pork mince on medium. After 5 minutes add remaining ingredients, except spring onions, and mix for a further 2 minutes. Add the prawn paste to the stand mixer and mix until combined. 

  3. Remove mixture and place in a large bowl. Fold through the tail third of the prawns and spring onions. 

  4. Place approximately 1 teaspoon of the mixture in the centre of each wonton wrapper then gently bunch dough against the mince to seal, refrain from using too much pressure. 

  5. In a saucepan of lightly salted water, boil wontons in small batches for 5-6 minutes or until they rise to the top. 6. Remove, strain and set aside. 


Noodles 

  1. Add all sauce ingredients into a large bowl and whisk well.  

  2. Optional: Spread noodles out on a baking tray to create a thin layer, and bake in oven for 10 minutes at 50°C. 

  3. Boil egg noodles in salted water for 45 – 60 seconds, then rinse under cold water briefly, keep the noodles warm. 

  4. Put noodles into the sauce bowl and mix well. 

  5. Serve in a bowl with wontons, blanched seasonal greens, and a small bowl of chicken broth garnished with spring onions, coriander and cracked pepper on the side.

© DUNCAN LU. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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